Special offer: 30% off pre-orders of The Oxford Handbook of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies

OHRFMS

Save £28.50 on the forthcoming Handbook when you order online today*. Discount valid until 31 May 2014.

Edited by Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh (University of Oxford), Gil Loescher (University of Oxford), Katy Long (University of Edinburgh), and Nando Sigona (University of Birmingham), The Oxford Handbook of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies offers outstanding contributions from renowned academics and practitioners and is an essential reference for students and scholars in this field.

From the publishers

This authoritative Handbook critically evaluates the birth and development of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies, and analyses the key contemporary and future challenges faced by academics and practitioners working with and for forcibly displaced populations around the world. The 52 state-of-the-art chapters, written by leading academics, practitioners, and policymakers working in universities, research centres, think tanks, NGOs and international organizations, provide a comprehensive and cutting-edge overview of the key intellectual, political, social and institutional challenges arising from mass displacement in the world today.

How to order

Click here to order online from the Oxford University Press website

*To get the 30% discount, order online from the Oxford University Press website, adding promotion code AAFLY6 to your shopping basket. Discount valid until 31/05/2014.

Postage and delivery

Website orders: FREE postage on orders of £20 or more (delivery in the UK only). Please allow 7 working days for delivery in the UK.

For more information about postage charges and delivery times visit: www.oup.com/uk/help/despatch

Advertisements

Legal status, rights and belonging: International symposia

The analysis of the relationship between legal status, rights and belonging is the central theme of two symposia jointly organised by the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago and the Centre on Migration, Policy and Society (COMPAS), the Refugee Studies Centre (RSC) and the Oxford Institute of Social Policy (OISP) at the University of Oxford.

The symposia are convened by Dr Roberto G. Gonzales  (University of Chicago) and myself .

Main Themes of the International Symposia

The events will be held respectively in Oxford in April 2013 and in Chicago in October 2013 and will address two interrelated aspects of the relationship between legal status, rights and belonging:

The symposium will investigate the interplay between forms and modes of contemporary membership, migration governance (both immigration and emigration), and the politics of belonging. This will be achieved through in-depth examinations of a range of experiences of membership including, but not limited to, those of:  ethnic minorities; citizen children of undocumented migrant parents; former unaccompanied asylum seeking children; people with dual citizenship; ‘failed’ asylum seekers; and stateless people. Participants are invited to discuss issues such as the position of the non-citizen in contemporary immigration and emigration states; the nexus between human mobility, immigration control, and citizenship; the tension in policy and practice between coexisting traditions and regimes of rights; and the intersection of ‘race’ and other social cleavages and legal status. The Oxford symposium is organised by Dr Nando Sigona (Refugee Studies Centre), Vanessa Hughes (COMPAS) & Dr Elaine Chase (Oxford Institute of Social Policy).

  • Illegality, youth and belonging  (Chicago, October 2013)

This second symposium will explore the confusing and contradictory experiences of belonging and illegality that frame the everyday lives of undocumented immigrant youth. Over the last two decades in the United States, non-citizens have experienced a shrinking of rights while immigrant communities have witnessed an intensification of enforcement efforts in neighbourhoods and public spaces. In effect, these trends have sewn fear and anxiety and narrowed the worlds of youth—such that even mundane acts of driving, waiting for the bus, and traffic stops can lead to the loss of a car, prison and deportation. But these young people have also benefited from local and national efforts to widen access—particularly in the realm of education—providing young immigrants important opportunities to establish connections, form relationships, and participate in the day-to-day life of their communities. The experiences of undocumented immigrant youth teach us about the two-sided nature of citizenship—such that persons can be removed from spaces, denied privileges and rights, but can experience belonging too.

Collectively this joint initiative aims to break new ground through analyses that are empirically informed, theoretically engaged and ethnographically rich and drawing on the expertise of scholars from a range of disciplinary backgrounds and state contexts. As immigration has become a topic of great visibility among scholars, policy makers, and the media, this endeavour holds appeal to a range of audiences. Read the Background paper & Call for Papers

Teaching Excellence Award 2012!

Post slightly out of character. I have just been informed that the Social Sciences Division of the University of Oxford has awarded me a Teaching Excellence Award for ‘outstanding contribution towards teaching on the MSc in Migration Studies‘.

I really enjoyed to work with colleagues on the course last year, particularly the almost daily contact with students. The fortnightly discussion class on critical debates in migration studies, the lectures and tutorials have thought me a great deal. It is really rewarding to receive a recognition for the effort I have put into teaching. this makes me even more keen to teach the course on Ethnographies of diaspora and transnationalism next term with my colleague Dr Mette Berg.